Camper Chatter: Inks Lake

What are you doing at school? Are you in sports, band, or clubs? Send Camp your news!

7_22_girls

TAYLOR GOERTZ, (Bastrop) and LIBBY LESTER (Southlake) met up to take a picture at TASC Student Council Summer Camp at Southwestern University this week

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Second term Milam Olson’s first diving class at SMU.  He loved it!   He caught the diving bug at CLH.  Attawaytodive!

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Charlotte and Julia Pounds at Fenway Park after camp!

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First term camper REN FERGUSON – Cabin Foxes welcomes his sibling to V-Day. MAGEE and HUNT  can't wait for 4th Term when they will be campers!


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Anna Caroline and Carlotta both organized and hosted a dodgeball tournament raising funds for ALS (Lou Gehrig Disease) May 13 with over 250 students from schools around Fort Worth. They raised over $30,000 for the ALS Association in honor of their Aunt Jennifer Corbett.
We are so proud of both young ladies. They created a website, promoted the event socially, obtained sponsors, secured a location,  insurance, volunteers and so much more to make this event a success

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This past weekend (May 20-21), Price Dickerson won The Club's 2017 Spring Junior State tennis tournament in Mississippi. (Price wore his lucky ATTAWAYTOGO hat in the final match.) Britton Dickerson was a finalist in the same tennis tournament. ATTAWAYTOGO!

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Third term campers (L-R) Will Holleman, Charlie Holleman, and Clara Holleman recently took time out of their surf adventure in Western Africa to show some CLH pride…Attawaytogo!

4_17_Mcknights

The McKnights, 2nd term campers (Vaughn, Latham, Ellery and Dad Allen) are excited to get back to the place among the hills and dales, even when we're in Austria...

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Kathleen Roberts (4th Term Inks), Frances Collins (2nd Term Indian Springs) and Sarah Roberts (4th Term Inks) say “Attaway” during their Spring Break ski trip to Montana!

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Price Dickerson and Britton Dickerson, Second Term campers, recently represented Camp Longhorn well at Deer Valley, Utah in March skiing the black diamond "White Owl" run, site of the 2002 Olympic Aerial Events.


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CLH 3rd term Campers from Fort Worth, went skiing in Crested Butte, CO, over Spring Break.
Pictured left to right, Front:  Riley Corbett (Springs ), Olivia Corbett (Springs ), Charlotte Patty (Inks Lake),
Luke Patty (Springs). Back Row:  Jake Hegi (Inks Lake ), Audrey Patty (Springs ), Will Hegi ( Springs )

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The Pounds family met up with Rachel Lee Nuemann's family in Steamboat Springs.  Left to Right:  Riley Neuman, Charlotte Pounds, Hallie Neuman and Julia Pounds. 

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Bill, Carol and Fran Robertson meet up with these current and former 3rd term campers in Lake Tahoe. Rhett Jenkins, Polly Jenkins, Kay Lee Jenkins, Layne Jenkins, Jeffrey Jenkins, and Meredith Bagan.

Hays

Future Apache/Navajo's had a pre-camp meeting at Bill's Restaurant in Burnet over Spring Break! They will all be attending 2nd Term together for the first time this year.

Left to Right: Hays Bennett – son of Stacy and David , Preston Fish - son of Alumns Heather and Jeff and Thomas Deen – son of Alumn Megan Wall.

3_13_17_Honor Society

Campers from all 3 camps were inducted into the Junior National Honor Society At Burnet Middle School.
Hayden Brown (Inks Lake), Hudson Bennett (Inks Lake), Ryan Shipley (C3), McKenzie Davis (Springs), Bailor Howell (C3), Kendall Bible (Springs), Kieran Mather (Springs), Hunter Luther (Springs)


soccer

Third term campers Bella Braga and Grace Pelletier from Coronado California won the Soccer State Cup. This included all teams South of Santa Barbara! Attawaytogo!!!

New Year

ALEX BROWN – 1st term and ERIKA MARTINEZ – 4th term met up for a day of skiing in keystone, CO!

BB Game

Here is a picture of Quinn Quigley (2nd Year) & his brother Kadin (1st year) with Quinn's godmother Jennifer Hile (CLH alumni from Ranch). This was over Christmas break when they went to visit Jennifer in Austin and went to a UT basketball game.

Red river

Emma Price with her Dallas CLH friend for life, Mary Kate Henson.....skiing together in Red River, NM!  ATTAWAYTOGO!

Brock and Kristin McLeod

Both Brock and Kristin McLeod are CLH camper 1st term.  They spent Christmas in New Zealand visiting family and vacationing.  Both kids told their kiwi aunts, uncles, and cousins all about CLH!  Here they are on Pauauni Beach, New Zealand (located on the North Island).  

magruders

The Magruder’s and Browns got together for a CLH reunion this Sunday at Joe T’s in Fort Worth. Megan and Stella(front row) are going into their 5th year at camp! They’ve been in the same cabin since Wren year! Sophie is going to be a COUNSELOR  next year wow!(top right corner). Katherine is going to be a chief an be going into her 9th year at camp! Finally Heather and Shea (middle) Heather went to camp for 13 years and Shea went to camp for 6 years.


ski

First term campers LIZZIE HALL and LIBBY LESTER snapped a quick photo on top of Crested Butte Mountain over the Christmas Holidays.  Attawaytoski!

fish

C3 Director TYLER ROBERTSON took  HUDSON BENNETT, a second term Inks camper and Tyler’s nephew out for a day of fishing In Rockport. Looks like he had a good day!

Portelas

Taking a cruise to the USVI and BVI islands over Thanksgiving break are the Portela brothers, JOSE and JAKE.  Randomly the boys both had on CLH shirts after they snorkeled caves and lunched on Norman Island. 


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HAYDEN BROWN, 4th term camper from Burnet. Not only loyal to UT... but loves CLH as well!

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Charles Brewer,  Inks 2nd term  and his Sister, Natalie Anne (new Camper 2017) and their Family recently went on a mission trip to Costa Rica, to help build housing. Charles started writing a Journal on his experience. On the plane back, he left the journal on a plane, and Southwest Airlines located and returned it to him! Waytogo Southwest!

11_28_16_Farr Tex

Farr’s all boys school does a prayer service and lines the fences to honor our Veterans.

Tex! Done by Farr Dickson, 4th term camper from Houston

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When Second term camper CHARLES BREWER went down with his Uncle for the first Texas game this year he met up with BESS, a friend he made at camp.

Westlake High School celebrates Homecoming in Austin.  Camp Longhorn campers got together for a group shot!  Attawaytogo!

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Left to right:  Carter Bost (1st term Inks Lake), Drew Willoughby (1st term Inks Lake), Haley Cole (1st term Indian  Springs), Avery Fredrickson
(3rd term C3 on Inks Lake), Emily Marquis (1st term Indian Springs), Brennan Haralson (1st term Inks Lake), Riley Saikin (1st term Inks Lake),
Christan Haralson (1st term Inks Lake), Presley Bennet (3rd term C3 on Inks Lake), Hanna Norwood (1st term Inks Lake), Dylan Spencer (1st term Inks Lake), Avery Platt (1st term Indian Springs), Kay Lee Jenkins (3rd term Inks Lake), Alexa Levine (1st term Indian Springs), Jaclyn Cockrell (1st term Indian Springs)

3 girls

A weekend in October the girls had an impromptu reunion as Genevieve was in town from Shreveport. Best friends since 1st term Wren year 2013!! (Lilly Price, Genevieve Carmody, Ella Rose)
Attawaytogo! Attawaytodab!!

Oatmeal_Run

CLH represented in the Oatmeal Festival "Run for Your Oats" 5k run. Mixture of C3, Springs and Inks.

Left to Right (top row): Dillon Crain (C3 counselor), Mary Patt Everest (Inks Mailroom Director), Hudson Bennett (Inks camper), Luke Kiser (C3 camper), Gracyn Bennett (Inks camper), Cade Rye (Inks camper).

Left to right (bottom row): David Bennett (C3 Director), Ryan Robertson (past Springs camper), and Zaida Freeman--not pictured (Springs camper).

   


HOME by Carly Kirkland, 2nd term Counselor

“Do you not miss home, even a little bit?”

This question arises every year as I pack up my red, sticker-covered trunk, in preparation to go to my favorite place in the world: Camp Longhorn. Explaining to everyone what camp is sounds easy, until you figure out that you can’t actually explain it at all. I’ve always struggled with defining camp and putting it into one category. I can’t say that I’m going to church camp, because we don’t do bible studies or go to worship every day, even though we say the Lord’s prayer at night and go to church on Sundays. I also can’t coin it as a sports camp, because you don’t go to camp to refine your tennis, soccer, or basketball skills.

If I had time to not just explain it in a nutshell, but REALLY explain it to everyone (that would take a good hour), I would say that Camp Longhorn is best described by a multitude of little, seemingly insignificant things. It’s eating Barney’s infamous bacon off of dull metal trays that look like they belong in a prison rather than a summer camp. It’s saying “yes ma’am” and “yes sir,” and not slamming the screen doors. It’s being quiet on the way to campfire and not allowing the water to shoot in the air as you drink from Old Faceful. It’s the only place in the world where doing all of these things earns little pieces of orange plastic (merits) that can be cashed in for a wide variety of things at the merit store. It’s the never ending play on words (hence the sailboats with names like TUMP 2016 and KNOT 4 SAIL). It’s cabins that float on water and walking up to Church Mountain every Sunday. It’s dance parties and singing “Day is done, gone the sun…” after every campfire. It’s a place characterized by positivity, one where the Dam is called the Darn, “everybody is somebody,” and “it’s not hot, it’s summertime!” I could go on and on, but Camp Longhorn can be most simply described by one word: tradition.

When I turned 7, my mom immediately put me on the waiting list to go to camp. I owe her for that one, big time. She had gone throughout her childhood, and was a counselor there for many years after. I had just completed the second grade, and had no idea what I was getting myself into. Meanwhile, my dad was skeptical, wondering why it was necessary to send his daughter to a summer camp in the Texas hill country for a long three weeks. But looking back, there was no way I could have ever imagined the magnitude of the joy the next twelve summers would bring me.

I drank the Camp Longhorn kool-aid that summer, and it’s safe to say that I drank it for life. Something about no A/C or electricity in the dead of summer and living with twelve other girls in a cabin with screen windows and doors proved to be incredibly appealing. On Visitor’s Day, my parents couldn’t find me when it was time to leave. I was sitting in the grass, overlooking the lake, crying. I couldn’t stand the thought of waiting 11 long months to go back to that little slice of heaven on Earth. The best gift my parents have ever given me is sending me to camp, there’s no question about that.

What makes Camp so great? It’s not just the fun activities, the food, or Carnival or Dance night. It isn’t the blob, the sailboats, or the lazy river. It’s the fact that each summer, I come back to a place and people that have not changed in the least. It feels like stepping into a time capsule, one that has been almost the exact same since I first rolled through those gates at the age of 7. My mom and I were discussing this on the drive back from Burnet yesterday. We had tears in our eyes as we compared our experiences at camp for the umpteenth time, only to find once again that there’s not much difference between them at all (except for the forty years that have passed). I can still look up and find her name written in many of the cabins I have slept in. Camp is a bond I share not just with my mom, but my brother as well. Growing up in Duncan (where no one really knew what camp was) I could always count on Coby to appreciate and share my love for camp.

I believe there is incredible value in tradition. Life, changes, and boy does it change fast. We live in a world where there’s always something bigger and better to be found. We are constantly pining and working for the next best thing, whether it’s the newest iPhone or the better job. This ambitious mindset isn’t necessarily bad, but it can also be incredibly exhausting. We are surrounded by a whirlwind of change in the “real” world, but at camp, that change is nearly impossible to find. The cabins are the same ones my mom slept in in 1984, and when she asks, “Do you all still do ____” there’s a 95% chance the answer is going to be yes. There’s something to be said for that consistency. No matter what happens during the school year, I know I have that safe haven among the hills and dales to go back to. My camp friends and I may not talk much during the year, but the minute we see that Camp Longhorn sign, it’s like we never left. We pick right back up where we left off, and I firmly believe that’s an element of great friendship. Throughout the years of blobbing, sailing, and swimming, I have met some of my best friends. There’s just something about camp’s steadfastness that fosters friendships no distance apart will ever break. It’s almost impossible to describe, but once you experience it, you will never be the same.

As I’ve gotten older, I’m beginning to face the fact that there is an eventual end to my time at camp. At some point, I will have to have something on my resume other than “camp counselor.” It’s something I really don’t like to think about, as I can’t imagine a summer not spent at camp. In college, I’ve found that there is a certain pressure to be the best. The world is a competitive place, and sometimes it seems like the only way to survive is to be the one with the best internship or job, returning from summer break with a piece of paper full of accomplishments. I’m not saying this is necessarily a bad thing, but the pressure to do it can be exhausting. Sometimes I feel like I am surrounded by a world that wants me to grow up as fast as I can, not stopping to take the time to look back. When I was in Italy a few weeks prior to camp, we met with the American embassy in Rome. A question asked by one of my classmates was “What is the most important piece of advice you would give college students today?” The politician’s answer surprised me. “Invest in experiences, and not necessarily internships.”

I realized (bittersweetly) at that moment that you’ve really only got so much time to be a kid. College is a weird limbo that sticks you right smack dab in between childhood and adulthood. Sometimes I feel so independent, thinking arrogantly and excitedly that I have it all figured out. Other times I really just want to cry and call my mom because I can’t figure out how to make the washing machine at the bottom of Adams actually wash my clothes. As my childhood days ebb and adulthood grows closer and closer, I’m realizing that camp is a sort of living memory. It is the one place I can go where I am truly one hundred percent a kid again. I see a reflection of my past there, and it’s one full of fond memories that I’ll carry with me forever.

No, I may not have the dream internship on my resume. But the experiences I have had at camp have given me invaluable skills that I know will carry me into adulthood. I know how to get along and live with all sorts of people, as you really don’t have much of a choice when you’re thrown together for three weeks. I know how to  I know how to resolve conflict, sail a boat, drive a motorboat, and swim a mile. Camp has prepared me for so much more than I could ever imagine.

To answer that first question, no, I don’t miss home. Not a bit. Why? Because Camp Longhorn is, quite simply put, my home away from home. When I see the sign that says “WELCOME TO CAMP LONGHORN” I know that I’ve got three weeks ahead of me full of childlike goofiness and finding joy in the smallest of things. The real world truly seems nonexistent, and when I leave, I leave with a clear head and heart.

It’s the only place I know where the world ends, and paradise begins.




An Essay by Lizzy Childress, third term

Your first thoughts when you drive through the gates of Camp Longhorn is WOW. You see Charlie the longhorn sitting on top of the gate. As you drive towards the actual camp you see all of these funny signs. They say things like rock in’ chair. People think that they mean rocking chair, but it is an actual rock in a chair. Your drive about five minutes from the gate until you see the activity climb. It has a rock wall, pamper pole, obstacle course, and so much more! You see people with smiles on their face. You pass Pit Stop and you have the choice to go to boys camp or girls camp; my bus of course goes to girls camp. You pass the Rio Flojo and finally see cabins! You get this rush of energy when you see the cabins. It is very hard to describe it but if you ever experience it, you will know what I’m talking about.

Everyone hops off a bus and a counselor tells them what cabin they are in for the term. Last term I was in the Falcon cabin. All of the girls cabins are named after birds. I always spent time in the Dove cabin because that was where my best camp friends were. You have a different number of counselors depending on your age. The little kids had four counselors, the middle-aged kids have three or four, and the oldest kids have two. You have 11 - 13 people in your cabin except for your last year, you have 25 - 30 people.

At Camp Longhorn you do a ton of different activities. Your cabin is assigned activities. There are 10 activities in a day. Some of the activities are swim, sail, soc, scuba, rifle, archery, fun and games, and my favorite blob! The blob is something that the founder of camp invented. His name was Tex. The blob is a huge blue, white, and orange air filled bouncy thing. It started out on land and it moved into water. There is a tower that you jump off of to get on the blob. Kids jump off the tower and try to bounce people off. Blob is most people’s favorite activity.

My favorite time of the day is chow time! We have the best cook at camp, his name is Barney. No he isn't a big purple dinosaur! He cooks breakfast, lunch, and dinner for all of the kids, counselors, and staff. My favorite meal he cooks is either spaghetti or pizza. The spaghetti is so good that people go back for seconds, thirds, and sometimes fourths! At chow we always sing Johnny Appleseed for our prayer. You sit with your cabin and it is a very fun bonding time!

Camp not only is fun, but it teaches you discipline. We have this thing called the merit system. A merit is an orange circle disk about the size of a quarter. If you do something good like saying yes ma’m or no ma’m, you might get a merit. Not only can you earn merits, but you can get demerits. You get a demerit if you slam the door or if you are mean. You can either save or spend your merits. There is a place called the Merit Store where they have a bunch of knick-knacks, t-shirts, blankets, and so much more!

Camp Longhorn is heaven on earth. I have made friends there that I will have for the rest of my life. I will go back every year as a camper and then I will be a counselor. Camp is a place where you aren’t judged and everyone loves you! I am so blessed to be able to call Camp Longhorn my home away from home. Camp longhorn is where the world ends and paradise begins!